RSPB’s breakfast birdwatch

| 27th March 2020
Blue tit
Pixabay
It is more important than ever to ensure the general public has a powerful connection with the nature on their doorstep.

With the arrival of spring, there is so much incredible nature returning, blooming, growing and thriving outside.

The RSPB has begun a daily Breakfast Birdwatch, taking place between 8-9am on weekdays, a time when many of us would have been commuting to work, doing the school run, or otherwise unable to enjoy the splendour of nature from the safety of our homes.

Using #BreakfastBirdwatch on social media, we hope to create a friendly, supportive and engaged community who are able to share what they can see in their gardens, on their balconies, rooftops and spaces from their own homes, all the while keeping within government guidelines in relation to Covid-19.

It is vital that nature can still be enjoyed by as many people as possible, whether keen birders, parents, children, those self-isolating or anyone else able to join in. Over the coming days and weeks, we will be helping people to share their wildlife encounters and provide ideas for things you can do for wildlife close to home.

Spring

With the arrival of spring, there is so much incredible nature returning, blooming, growing and thriving outside, and while we are in the midst of an unparalleled crisis, we must not forget the power of nature, including how watching nature can be so positive for our mental health and wellbeing.

Throughout the coming weeks, Breakfast Birdwatch will focus on different themes and different species, helping to identify what our supporters have seen and heard, and answering questions along the way.

The RSPB will have different themes, focussing on different species and helping supporters stay creative with ideas such as drawing and poetry

It is more important than ever to ensure the general public has a powerful connection with the nature on their doorstep, as outdoor activity remains limited and with our reserves closed.

This Article 

This article is based on a press release from the RSPB. 

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