COP26: Meet don't meat

Alok Sharma is the minister in charge of Cop26. 

 

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Animal rights charity PETA asks COP26 president to serve vegan menu for delegates.

Each person who goes vegan spares nearly 200 animals every year misery in squalid, crowded conditions on farms and a terrifying death at the abattoir.

Alok Sharma, the president of the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26), has been asked to serve a vegan menu to delegates by animal rights activists PETA to highlight the high carbon cost of producing meat.

In the letter, PETA notes that vegan catering would not only reduce the carbon footprint of the event but also its waste of water. It takes 15,415 litres of water to produce just one kilogram of beef, and that metric doesn’t even account for all the greenhouse gases that animal agriculture generates.

Industries

Sharma, a member of the British cabinet, was given an alternative way to reduce the water impact of the conference - with PETA suggesting he stop showering until the event opens in Glasgow in November.

Kate Werner, a senior campaigns manager at PETA, said in the letter: “Given that the meat and dairy industries are a leading cause of the climate crisis that COP26 is seeking to address, removing these items from the catering menu seems like a no-brainer.”

Each person who goes vegan spares nearly 200 animals every year misery in squalid, crowded conditions on farms and a terrifying death at the abattoir.

Abattoir

"By going vegan, delegates would all get to dine on delicious, Earth and animal friendly food - and go ahead and have your shower, too”.

A statement from PETA added: "Each person who goes vegan spares nearly 200 animals every year misery in squalid, crowded conditions on farms and a terrifying death at the abattoir."

This Author

Brendan Montague is the editor of The Ecologist. This article is based on a press release from PETA. PETA offers a free vegan starter kit on its website. For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk or follow the group on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram.

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