conservation

'A rich conservationist is a rare species'

Wendyrosie Scott
| 15th May 2018
Cash for conservationism is crucial if projects are to have a meaningful, long-lasting impact. That's why the continued funding of the Whitley Awards - the so-called "green oscars" of the conservation world - is essential, says WENDYROSIE SCOTT

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Two lions

Scientists get ever closer to discovering the mystery of 'man eating lions'

Curtis Abraham
| 12th April 2018
Ogeto Mwebi, a senior research scientist at the Department of Zoology of the National Museums of Kenya and Nduhiu Gitahi, the chief technologist at the Department of Public Health, Pharmacology & Toxicology based at Nairobi University are attempting now to uncover the mystery behind two man eating lions from more than a century ago. CURTIS ABRAHAM investigates

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Wildlife conservation should not be a Western import

Humphrey Kariuki
| 20th December 2017
The Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy is empowering a new generation of Kenyans to reclaim the conservationist narrative. HUMPRHEY KARIUKI, a patron of the society, explores how wildlife conservation in Africa is harmed by a Western dominated approach.

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The evolution of armed conflict in Africa

Curtis Abraham
| 21st November 2017
For a generation the nature of warfare in Africa has evolved due to technological advances. The scale of destructiveness in modern warfare has increased. This has had a negative impact on wildlife and its habitats, which had traditionally protected wild animals and environments. CURTIS ABRAHAM reports.

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The Susu clan are self-sufficient and manage the land sustainably. They produce food to sustain themselves but also harvest cash crops like palm oil, rubber and sugar cane for income. (C) Friends of the Earth International, via Flickr

The palm oil crisis in Nigeria - and beyond

Burag Gurden
| 8th September 2017
The use and spread of palm oil is beyond imagination; from cooking and manufacturing to pharmaceuticals and drilling fluids, it is even in nanny's chocolate cake. Its global consumption may have increased more than any other good, but what does this entail for the farmers? The crisis in Edo State of Nigeria speaks for itself, reports BURAG GURDEN

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Nightingale, Minsmere RSPB, Suffolk (c) Ian Curran.

Eleventh hour reprieve for one of the last bastions of nightingales

Brendan Montague
| 7th September 2017
A planning application to build thousands of new houses on Lodge Hill, one of the last strongholds for nightingales in the UK, has been withdrawn. More than 12,000 people objected to the application to build on the Site of Special Scientific Interest, leading to a Public Inquiry being scheduled for March 2018. BRENDAN MONTAGUE reports

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Ecologist Special Report: Biological Annihilation on Earth is Accelerating

Robert J. Burrowes
| 1st August 2017
Human beings are now waging war against life itself as we continue to destroy not just individual lives, local populations and entire species in vast numbers but also the ecological systems that make life on Earth possible. By doing this we are now accelerating the sixth mass extinction event in Earth's history and virtually eliminating any prospect of human survival, writes ROBERT J BURROWES

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Introduction to Rewilding

Kara Moses
| 14th July 2017
Everyone is talking about rewilding at the moment. The debate around it is shaking up the conservation sector and public interest in it is huge, with a growing movement of people advocating the restoration of our degraded ecosystems. But what does it really mean to rewild? And how would you go about doing it if you actually have some land?

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Spotlight on Regeneration: The Timbaktu Collective bridging community and conservation

Siddharth Rao
Conservation Biologist
| 12th July 2017
This year saw the launch of the Lush ethical cosmetics company's first-ever Spring Prize which rewarded organisations around the world who are committed to social and environmental regeneration. Lush is a content collaboration partner with the Ecologist and this is the first in a series of special reports from the 11 prize winners explaining more about their project and its goals. SIDDHARTH RAO introduces the Timbaktu Collective which won an award for its inspiring regeneration and conservation work with some of the most marginalised communities in India

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How planting bioenergy crops could help stop Britain's brown hare from becoming extinct

Laura Briggs
| 6th June 2017

If you live or spend time in the UK countryside it may have been some time since you spotted the native brown hare - if you've ever seen one at all. That's because the hare relies on an increasingly disappearing biodiverse landscape for its food. LAURA BRIGGS talks to the scientists behind a new study investigating what type of planting - including bioenergy crops - will help stop hare populations from continuing to decline

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The Tree Line: Poems for Trees, Woods & People

Harriet Griffey
Cultural Editor
| 2nd June 2017
There's a certain irony that the publication of a new anthology of poems about trees coincided with President Trump's announcement yesterday that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change, writes HARRIET GRIFFEY

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