indigenous people

The Susu clan are self-sufficient and manage the land sustainably. They produce food to sustain themselves but also harvest cash crops like palm oil, rubber and sugar cane for income. (C) Friends of the Earth International, via Flickr

The palm oil crisis in Nigeria - and beyond

Burag Gurden
| 8th September 2017
The use and spread of palm oil is beyond imagination; from cooking and manufacturing to pharmaceuticals and drilling fluids, it is even in nanny's chocolate cake. Its global consumption may have increased more than any other good, but what does this entail for the farmers? The crisis in Edo State of Nigeria speaks for itself, reports BURAG GURDEN

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Securing a Future With Water Along Peru's Rimac River Valley

Forest Ray
| 20th July 2017



Along the Rimac River Valley of Peru, local farmers have taken the problem of water security into their own hands and embarked on a combined reforestation and water storage project, which not only provides safe water but has empowered the local community and, thanks to improving the mountainside soil stability, has reduced the risk of devastating landslides. FOREST RAY reports

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Conference Seeks Security for Embattled Environmental Activists

Olesia Plokhii
| 19th June 2017
This week, the first-ever Forest Defenders Conference, organized by environmental activist support group Not1More, takes place (21st-22nd June) at St. Hugh's College in Oxford, UK. The aim of the conference is to highlight the growing risks and help develop safety strategies for frontline environmentalists who face increasing violence for their work.
OLESIA PLOKHII reports

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Almir Narayamoga Surui, Chief of the Paiter Surui meeting Prince Charles in 2010 after being awarded a major prize for his humanitarian and ecological work

This is my cry of alarm, please listen to me!

Almir Narayamoga Surui
Chief of the Paiter Surui indigenous people
| 17th October 2016
Today, the Chief of the Paiter Surui indigenous people in the state of Rondônia, Brazil has issued the following plea for help to stop illegal logging and mining on their lands. The letter is unedited.

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WITNESS: Colombia's indigenous Wayuu suffer the effects of climate change, drought and rising food prices

Laura Dixon - La Guajira
Colombia
| 17th October 2016
La Guajira, a dusty but spartanly beautiful region in Colombia's desert north is in the grips of a crisis. Climate change, desertification and water shortages have combined to create a perfect storm for the local rural community: a drought so severe some places did not feel a drop of rain for three years writes LAURA DIXON

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There's no tree-huggers here: Why the ‘systems' approach to climate action is preventing change...

Katie Arthur
| 15th August 2016
Half a year or so on from the historic signing of the Paris Agreement at the COP21, the smiling promises and diplomatic handshakes have not only left the mainstream media but left us still waiting for the shift to a greener world. NEW VOICES contributor, KATIE ARTHUR looks at whether we can ever expect systems to change without transformed attitudes to lead the way...

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Change The System - Not The Climate

Asoka Bandarage
| 16th June 2016
Those most affected by climate change are those least responsible and the international policy frameworks in place to protect them don't work making it a moral issue. But we must believe that the larger goals of environmental sustainability and social justice can be achieved - if we just work together writes Asoka Bandarage

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Even though the Baram dam is on hold, logging of the reservoir area and surrounding forest is proceeding apace. Photo: Rod Harbinson.

Indigenous activists celebrate bitter victory over rainforest dam moratorium

Rod Harbinson
Mongabay
| 22nd October 2015
As indigenous activists opposing hydropower dams on their territories gather this weekend in the rainforests of Sarawak, Malaysia, they have good news to celebrate, writes Rod Harbinson: a giant dam on the Baram river has been put on hold. But the forests are still being logged, local people have been stripped of land rights, and a programme of 12 giant dams is still official policy.

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Torched Senger home. Photo: Justin Kenrick.

Kenya: police begin Forest People evictions

The Ecologist
| 23rd January 2014
The Kenyan government has begun to forcibly evict tens of thousands of Sengwer indigenous people from their ancestral forest lands and burn their homes, food stores and belongings to the ground. The World Bank wrings its hands.

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A black-backed jackal leaning over to drink from a waterhole in the Kalahari Desert. Photo: Villiers Steyn / shutterstock.com.

The great Kalahari frack attack

Jeff Barbee
Mira Dutschke
David Smith
| 18th November 2013
Botswana has been accused of sacrificing the Kalahari, one of the world's most precious wildlife reserves, to commercial fracking while ignoring the concerns of environmentalists and communities who could lose access to scarce water.

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