Reviews

The Islands and the Whales - a deeply enchanting film

Brendan Montague
| 28th March 2018
The huldufolk have disappeared from the Faroe Islands, and with them an ancient understanding of nature. They vanished when in the 1950s when the roads and the lights appeared. Now, the local community are coming to terms with further extinctions - and a threat to their own lives from coal pollution. BRENDAN MONTAGUE reviews The Islands and the Whales, out tomorrow.

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Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

'Species other than ours are far more like ours than most of us believe'

Curtis Abraham
| 23rd March 2018
Elizabeth Marshall Thomas published The Hidden Life of Dogs in 2000 and enjoyed more than a year on the New York Times bestseller list. Now she is publishing the Hidden Life of Life: a Walk through the Reaches of Time. Here she takes on the scientific assumption that animals do not have consciousness and memory. CURTIS ABRAHAM interviewed her for The Ecologist

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Elinor Ostrom

What Elinor Ostrom can teach us about ecology, common ownership and community

Aaron Vansintjan
| 9th March 2018
Elinor Ostrom provides invaluable insights into economics and ownership - and the profound impact this has on our natural environment. Unfortunately, her work is not well known or widely understood. Derek Wall hopes to change that with his book, Elinor Ostrom’s Rules for Radicals. AARON VANSINTJAN met the author and asked why we should read her works today

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Man taking Al Gore's photograph

Why Al Gore fears Donald Trump - but remains optimistic for America

Brendan Montague
| 11th December 2017
Film directors Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk spent months with Al Gore observing his climate advocacy behind the scenes and at close hand. BRENDAN MONTAGUE asks about Gore, Trump, the impact of watching the melting glaciers and meeting many of the millions of activists worldwide determined to make a difference.

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Watership Down, by Richard Adams, had a profound impact on a generation of children after it was published in 1972. A remake of the film is now in production.

Land Lines: capturing our relationship with the natural world

Elizabeth Wainwright
| 15th November 2017
Our bond with the natural world is ever changing. To look at how books capture this shifting relationship, new research project ‘Land Lines’ is looking for the nation’s favourite nature book. And The Ecologist will be launching a new series of book reviews to celebrate and learn from nature writing, writes ELIZABETH WAINWRIGHT. Interested? -- You can get involved in both.

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Wendell Berry - poet, essayist, farmer, activist, rural philosopher

Harriet Griffey
Cultural Editor
| 10th July 2017
How do you define a man who has been at the forefront of the environmental movement of America for over 50 years - poet, essayist, environmentalist, farmer, activist, philosopher? Wendell Berry is all these and now his life's work sits at the heart, writes HARRIET GRIFFEY, of Look and See - a newly-released film about his life and philosophy

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The Tree Line: Poems for Trees, Woods & People

Harriet Griffey
Cultural Editor
| 2nd June 2017
There's a certain irony that the publication of a new anthology of poems about trees coincided with President Trump's announcement yesterday that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change, writes HARRIET GRIFFEY

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Bacon with nipple: Still from 'Carnage' by Simon Amstell / BBC iPlayer.

'Carnage' imagines a vegan utopia where animals live as equals - could it happen?

Matthew Adams
University of Brighton
| 28th March 2017
In the year 2067, the eating of meat - carnism - will be seen as crime similar to cannibalism today, writes Matthew Adams. That is, in the fertile imagination of Simon Amstell, expressed in his BBC iPlayer film 'Carnage'. With 55 billion animals slaughtered every year for their meat, the vision looks remote. But the world will be a far better place if we begin the transition to plant-based diets - for our health, that of the planet, and not least, the animals themselves.

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From front cover of 'Slugs and Snails by Robert Cameron, published by Harper Collins.

Slugs and snails

Martin Spray
| 7th March 2017
In this long-anticipated volume, Robert Cameron introduces us to the natural history of slugs and snails of the British Isles, writes Martin Spray, also venturing across the world to explore the wide range of structures and ways of life of slugs and snails, particularly their sometimes bizarre mating habits, which in turn help to illuminate the ways in which evolution has shaped the living world.

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