Hogwood wins at British Documentary Film Festival

| 12th August 2020
Hogwood
Hogwood
The animal rights documentary Hogwood: A Modern Horror Story has won the Wild Animal award at this year’s prestigious British Documentary Film Festival.

Not only are these horrors hidden from sight, but they are endorsed by huge corporations and the Government.

Hogwood: A Modern Horror Story follows an intrepid group of undercover investigators as they enter the UK’s biggest factory farms.

The conspiracy unfolds as they fight against some of the most powerful players in the animal agriculture industry, delicately weaving a chilling tale of negligence and greed.

Narrated by Jerome Flynn, best known for his role as Bronn in HBO’s Game of Thrones, the documentary centres around the quaintly named Hogwood farm.

Disturbing 

Jerome opens the documentary against the picturesque backdrop of rural England, just minutes away from the farm. He tells the disturbing tale of Hogwood and how it came to be one of the most infamous pig farms in the UK.

His narrative is intertwined with undercover footage and interviews with investigators and activists representing the animal welfare group Viva! — who conducted the campaign.

Now, Hogwood has won an award for outstanding film-making at the British Documentary Film Festival.

Each year, the festival screen's the very best indie documentaries at a prestigious premiere in London. 

Hogwood was selected as a finalist for two award categories – the 'Best British Short' and the 'Wild Animal Award' – and was named the winner of the Wild Animal Award. This category celebrates documentaries that capture animals and wildlife in a creative and engaging way.

Award

Tony Wardle, director of Hogwood and associate director of Viva! said: “We couldn’t be more thrilled to win this award. I have been producing investigative documentaries for many years and no film has been more harrowing than Hogwood.

"There are modern horror stories taking place each day in the British countryside. Not only are these horrors hidden from sight, but they are endorsed by huge corporations and the Government. That is why this film had to be made — because the public has a right to see what takes place beyond the factory farm walls.

"A big thank you to the judges at the British Documentary Film Festival for recognising our film."

Speaking about the film, the British Documentary Film Festival judges said: "Your documentary handled an incredibly disturbing topic very well and it's certainly changed a few of our staff's food shopping habits because of it."

This Author

Brendan Montague is editor of The Ecologist. This article is based on a press release from Viva! 

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