bees

Why the bee is the best beekeeper

Miriam Darlington
| 25th July 2018
Woodcarver Matt Somerville believes harvesting honey should be more natural so he has devised a new kind of hive aimed at benefitting the health and sustainability of bee colonies. MIRIAM DARLINGTON met him.

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Huge research programme announced to protect bees

Catherine Harte
| 19th June 2018
The alarm bells of declining bee populations worldwide have gone largely unnoticed. But a new study which will look specifically into the effects of agrochemicals on one of our key pollinators hopes its findings will help protect them well into the future. CATHERINE HARTE reports

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How beekeeping has turned around the lives of a community in Brazil

Katie Dancey-Downs
| 4th May 2018
Some honey producers have a bad reputation for welfare standards - but many beekeepers are doing things very differently. The Barro Vermelho community in Brazil is using beekeeping to help regenerate the natural world, increase bee populations, and simultaneously create a better life for people. Eusebio De Carvalho told his story to The Lush Times writer KATIE DANCEY-DOWNS

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Bee on blossom

Campaigners rejoice European Union neonicotinoid ban

Catherine Early
| 30th April 2018
Bee-killing insecticides will face a near total ban in Europe following a vote by member states in favour of proposals by the European Commission. The UK government supported the ban, which it says it will maintain after Brexit. CATHERINE EARLY reports

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The Lemur Catta Face Lemur is one of many animals endemic to Madagascar, where over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth.

Ambatovy: a tale of reverse development?

Laurence Soustras
| 23rd November 2017
A planned nickel mine in Madagasca has led to numerous environmental problems, and whilst the mine continues to struggle the environmental concerns surrounding the project continue to grow. LAURENCE SOUSTRAS investigates.

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Brexit is not a good time to be a British bee - claims Green MEP

Molly Scott Cato MEP
| 3rd July 2017
Bees in Britain are looking enviously at their EU neighbours. The EU is set to extend a ban on neonicotinoid pesticides - but agri-chemical lobbyists have the ear of pro-Brexit Tories, argues Molly Scott Cato MEP. The member of the European Parliament’s Agricultural Committee responds to our report in The Ecologist on Friday about new corporate funded research confirming the threat to bees. She argues it is now time to redouble our efforts to protect our vital pollinators.

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Brexit - a nasty sting in the tail for Britain's bees?

Dave Timms
| 21st June 2016
Britain's bees are under threat from Brexit and moves to allow farmers to use banned bee-harming 'neonictinoid' pesticides, warns Dave Timms, Bees Campaigner with Friends of the Earth. With 20 species extinct since 1900 and a further 35 under threat, how much more can our bees take?

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Forager bee pollinating a passion flower. Photo: Max Westby via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Chlorpyrifos 'may threaten survival' of Forager bees

The Ecologist
| 11th March 2016
The insecticide chlorpyrifos is not just highly toxic to developing human foetuses. A new study finds that it also damages the memory and learning ability of Forager bees even at very low doses, threatening the survival of this important pollinator.

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A huge wild bee hive in Indian forest. Photo: Karunakar Rayker via Flickr (CC BY).

Climate change is killing off India’s bees

Pramila Krishnan
| 1st March 2016
A warming climate and the loss of natural areas are driving Indian bee colonies to the brink, writes Premila Krishnan. Losing this cousin of our European honeybee could be disastrous, as rural communities depend on their honey for food and income, and the bees perform vital pollination services.

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Female Agapostemon sp. sweat bee, Oregon, USA. Photo: Thomas Shahan via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Farm expansion driving US native bee declines

Beyond Pesticides
| 28th December 2015
Wild bee decline is closely associated with the advance of intensive farming and habitat loss, a new study shows. It follows an earlier paper that linked 'delayed action' decline of wild bees to exposure to pesticides including fungicides - previously considered 'bee-safe'.

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Bumblebee, maybe Bombus terrestris or B. lucorum, at Fairlands Valley Park Environment Lake, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, 5 July 2013. Photo: Peter O'Connor aka anemoneprojectors via Flickr (CC BY-SA).

Our threatened bees deserve better!

Sandra Bell
Friends of the Earth
| 4th November 2015
On the first anniversary of the UK's National Pollinator Strategy, writes Sandra Bell, the Bee Coalition warns that bees are still under threat from highly toxic pesticides, continuing loss of habitat, and an increasingly inhospitable countryside. The Government must do more to protect our bees.

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Wild Poppies flowering on edge of a wheat field in Essex. Beautiful - what about the bees? Photo: ukgardenphotos via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Bee-killer pesticides concentrate in wild flower pollen

Oliver Tickell
| 15th October 2015
Wild flower margins around arable fields can funnel deadly pesticides into the bees, wild pollinators and other insects they are intended to benefit, writes Oliver Tickell. Neonic pesticides are often far more concentrated in the wild flowers than in the crop itself.

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The North American bumblebee Bombus vosnesenskii in Vancouver, Canada. Photo: Sean McCann via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Warming world traps bumblebees in 'climate vice'

Tim Radford
| 10th July 2015
As Europe and North America warm, bumblebees should be able to fly north to cooler climes, writes Tim Radford. But they're not: the bees' range is receding in the south, but staying put in the north, and scientists fear their shrinking habitat will put many species at risk of extinction.

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